Tag Archives: hospital

Going to hospital with a loved one

5 Apr

 

Going to hospital with a loved one

 

There is that horrible phone call, from the police or paramedics that lets you know that something terrible has happened.  It’s almost always at an inconvenient time and they want you to drop what you’re doing and head off to the hospital or come to where they are, if you are near enough.

 

If the matter is a life and death emergency, then you will be advised to meet them there and they will be blue lighted to the hospital or possibly even by helicopter.  If not the ambulance will make its way to the hospital and you can meet them there.

 

Depending on where you are in relation to your relative and the hospital, if you arrive before them, then the emergency department administrators will know they are on the way and will be able to give you an approximate time of arrival.

 

There is a four hour target of arriving at A&E and being discharged from there, either home or into the hospital, possible to a medical assessment ward (MAU).  This four hours does not start to run, until the paramedics have handed them over and there can be a queue for that, which can take up to an hour or even more.  Therefore the expectation that this will be done within 4 hours of the ambulance pulling up at the hospital doesn’t necessarily take this extra time into account.  So when you get to the hospital and pass by a place that sells food and drink, buy some, you could be waiting a long time and might need sustenance.  Make sure that you have a book or your phone is fully charged, as the waiting may be boring and you might need something to occupy you.

 

There are periods of activity and a lot of waiting as the staff undertake their investigations, they undertake a lot of their work with you nearby, but not there for reasons of access and dignity.

 

The area can be very busy, depending on what time of day and what day of the week, late on a Saturday night is not a great time for an elderly relative to have a fall!  The staff are busy and are trying hard to do their jobs effectively in a challenging environment and many retain great empathy skills even when under immense pressure.

 

If you have a power of attorney for health and welfare and your relatives has issues with their mental capacity, then it is worthwhile ensuring that you have a copy of it available, if possible.  If you’re loved one lacks capacity to make a decision, then you make it for them, so you will need to let the staff know that you have it, to ensure that any decisions that need to be made are done so, having discussed them with you and asked for your final decision.

 

If there is no power of attorney for health and welfare, then they should still discuss the situation with you and ask what your loved one would want, however the final decision as to what to do is the healthcare professionals and they are required to make a decision in that person’s best interests.

 

When someone you love is poorly, it is always a distressing time, watching them ill and/or in pain.  You are there and you are trying your best, that’s all you can do, so be kind to yourself about how stressful this situation is.

 

My key suggestions therefore are:

Be prepared for a long wait.

Get some food and something to drink during that wait.

Bring your health and welfare lasting power of attorney.

Be patient and respectful to the staff.

Be kind to yourself with how upset you might feel.

 

 

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Withdrawal of Life Sustaining Treatment

4 Jan

 

Withdrawal of Life Sustaining Treatment

 

There have been a couple of cases coming to Court recently regarding the withdrawal of life sustaining treatment.  Court cases are always stressful and can be very expensive, so in recent cases, the question has been asked as to whether it is necessary to go to Court in every case.  These kinds of cases arise where there is no attorney under a Lasting Power of Attorney, appointed to make decisions about life sustaining treatment.

 

There is practise direction (legal guidance for the Court process), that indicates that it should, however this practise direction is being withdrawn in December and not replaced, which effectively means it’s being deleted!

 

The Court considered lots of things and made it clear that every decision to withdraw life sustaining treatment is always unique and case specific.  They also said that every person is entitled to the rights under the European Human Rights Convention and in particular they are entitled to Article 2 (right to life) and Article 6 (right to a fair trial).

 

One of the first cases of its kind was the case of Anthony Bland, who survived the Hillsborough disaster, but in a permanently vegetative state.  The NHS Trust caring for him applied to the Court for permission to withdraw life sustaining treatment in 1993, the order was granted, as it was decided in the circumstances it was in his best interests to do so.  At that time, the Court’s view was that all such cases should be considered by the Court.  As time has gone on and medical advances have improved, there are more very poorly people being kept artificially alive with the use of medicine and in particular artificial nutrition and hydration.

 

So what has the Court decided?

 

It is still an individual decision relevant to the circumstances of each case.  However the Court has also decided that it is not always necessary to apply to the Court for a decision to withdraw life sustaining treatment where all parties are in agreement, including the family and all clinical team treating the patient.  They must be sure that there is no prospect of recovery and that it is in their best interests to withdraw the treatment.  They should also attempt to find out what their wishes would have been, had they been able to express them.  There should also be no doubts or concerns about the decision, otherwise, the case should be brought to Court.

 

So what does this mean?

 

That life sustaining treatment might be withdrawn without having to go to Court, as long as there are no concerns about the decision and everyone is in agreement.  However these recent cases are not guarantees that the matter will not be brought to Court, just that it might not be!

 

The other key point is that it is best practise, a lot easier and less stressful to grant a Lasting Power of Attorney for Health and Welfare, appointing someone you trust, who would be able to make this decision on your behalf.  One of the cases was for a 52 year old man, who had a cardiac arrest, it was not possible to resuscitate him for 10 minutes, leading to permanent brain damage and he would need care for the rest of his life.  As long as your proposed attorneys are over the age of 18, there is no time when it is too early to do this, then they can be stored until or if they are every needed.

 

If you need help or advice regarding LPAs, please contact me.